Favorite Friday Fiction: DawnSinger by Janalyn Voigt

I read many genres but one of my favorite is fantasy. DawnSinger by Janalyn Voigt is a delight for anyone who enjoys fantastic characters, dragons, and journeys through exotic lands. This one is a winner in my book…

 

DawnSinger (Tales of Faeraven)

The High Queen is dying… At the royal summons, Shae mounts a wingabeast and soars through the air to the high hold of Faeraven, where all is not as it seems. Visions warn her of danger, and a dark soul touches hers in the night. When she encounters an attractive but disturbing musician, her wayward heart awakens. But then there is Kai, a guardian of Faeraven and of Shae. Secrets bind him to her, and her safety lies at the center of every decision he makes.

On a desperate journey fraught with peril and the unknown, they battle warlike garns, waevens, ferocious raptors, and the wraiths of their own regrets. Yet, they must endure the campaign long enough to release the DawnKing’and the salvation he offers’into a divided land. To prevail, each must learn that sometimes victory comes only through surrender.

 

Favorite Friday Fiction: The Prodigal by Brennan Manning & Greg Garrett

The Prodigal: A Ragmuffin Story by Brennan Manning & Greg Garrett is another one of those books you can’t put down. The book evoked anger, pity, fear, and other emotions within the analogy and beautiful written words. Another good one…

The Prodigal

Jack Chisholm is “the people’s pastor.” He leads a devoted and growing megachurch, has several best-selling books, and a memorable slogan, “We have got to do better.” Jack knows how to preach, and he understands how to chastise people into performing. What he doesn’t know is anything about grace.

This year, when it comes time for the Christmas sermon, the congregation at Grace Cathedral will look to the pulpit, and Jack will not be there. Of course, they will have seen plenty of him already–on the news.

After an evening of debauchery that leads to an affair with his beautiful assistant, Jack Chisholm finds himself deserted with chilling swiftness. The church elders remove him from his own pulpit. His publisher withholds the royalties from his books. Worst of all, his wife disappears with their eight-year-old daughter.

But just as Jack is hitting bottom, hopeless and penniless, drinking his way to oblivion, who should appear but his long-estranged father, imploring his prodigal son: “Come home.”

A true companion piece to The Ragamuffin Gospel, The Prodigal illustrates the power of grace through the story of a broken man who finally saw Jesus not because he preached his greatest sermon or wrote his most powerful book, but because he failed miserably. Jack Chisholm lost everything–his church, his family, his respect, and his old way of believing–but he found grace. It’s the same grace that Brennan Manning devoted his life to sharing: profound in nature and coming from a God who loves us just as we are, and not as we should be.

Favorite Friday Fiction: The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis

The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis is actually a series of seven fantasy books: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, Prince Caspian, The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, The Silver Chair, The Horse and His Boy, The Magician’s Nephew, and The Last Battle. They are full of allegory and I love books with those subtle or sometimes not so subtle hidden meanings. The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe is probably the best-known but my personal favorites are The Horse and His Boy and The Last Battle.

The Chronicles of Narnia

The Chronicles of Narnia is a series of seven fantasy novels by C. S. Lewis. It is considered a classic of children’s literature and is the author’s best-known work, having sold over 100 million copies in 47 languages. Written by Lewis, illustrated by Pauline Baynes, and originally published in London between 1950 and 1956, The Chronicles of Narnia has been adapted several times, complete or in part, for radio, television, the stage, and film.

Set in the fictional realm of Narnia, a fantasy world of magic, mythical beasts, and talking animals, the series narrates the adventures of various children who play central roles in the unfolding history of that world. Except in The Horse and His Boy, the protagonists are all children from the real world, magically transported to Narnia, where they are called upon by the lion Aslan to protect Narnia from evil and restore the throne to its rightful line. The books span the entire history of Narnia, from its creation in The Magician’s Nephew to its eventual destruction in The Last Battle.

Favorite Friday Fiction: This Fine Life by Eva Marie Everson

This Fine Life is a well-written novel which I thoroughly enjoyed and it also takes place in the late 1950’s. Everson has a way of blending  lovely descriptions with her use of the Southern dialect to make a story just right. You’ll love all of her books…

 

This Fine Life

It is the summer of 1959 and Mariette Puttnam has just graduated from boarding school. When she returns to her privileged life at home, she isn’t sure where life will take her. More schooling? A job? Marriage? Nothing feels right. How could she know that the answer is waiting for her within the narrow stairwell of her father’s apparel factory, exactly between the third and fourth floors? 

In this unique and tender story of an unlikely romance, popular author Eva Marie Everson takes readers on a journey through the heart of a young woman bound for the unknown. Readers will experience the joys of new love, the perseverance of true friendship, and the gift of forgiveness that comes from a truly fine life.

Favorite Friday Fiction: Rooms by James L. Rubart

My all-time favorite contemporary novel is Rooms by James L. Rubart. I found its message to be life-changing. The way Rubart weaves a supernatural feel into his down -to-earth stories will take your breath away. And that’s a good thing…

 

Rooms

On a rainy spring day in Seattle, young software tycoon Micah Taylor receives a cryptic, twenty-five-year-old letter from a great uncle he never knew. It claims a home awaits him on the Oregon coast that will turn his world inside out. Suspecting a prank, Micah arrives at Cannon Beach to discover a stunning brand new nine-thousand square foot house. And after meeting Sarah Sabin at a nearby ice cream shop, he has two reasons to visit the beach every weekend.

When bizarre things start happening in the rooms of the home, Micah suspects they have some connection to his enigmatic new friend, Rick, the town mechanic. But Rick will only say the house is spiritual. This unnerves Micah because his faith slipped away like the tide years ago, and he wants to keep it that way. But as he slowly discovers, the home isn’t just spiritual, it’s a physical manifestation of his soul, which God uses to heal Micah’s darkest wounds and lead him into an astonishing new destiny.

Click to tweet: My all-time favorite contemporary novel is Rooms by James L. Rubart. #speculative #amreading

Favorite Friday Fiction: Annabelle’s Ruth & Sutter’s Landing by Betty Thomason Owens

What’s better than our Favorite Friday Fiction book of the week? When I share two books, of course! Today I introduce Betty Thomason Owens, good friend and author extraordinaire. I loved Annabelle’s Ruth (The Kinsman Redeemer series book 1) when it released in 2015. And when book two, Sutter’s Landing, released in June of this year, I wasn’t disappointed. You’ll love these books set in the 1950’s…

Annabelle’s Ruth

“If you think you can come back here and throw yourself on my mercy, you are quite wrong.” 

After their husbands perish in a fishing boat accident, Connie Cross determines to follow her mother-in-law, Annabelle, from Southern California to Tennessee. Her misgivings begin as they cross the bridge over the muddy Mississippi River. In their new town, where living conditions are far below their previous expectations, they must set up a household and hunt for work to survive. Thanks to the kindness of Annabelle’s handsome, young cousin, life begins to settle down. But Connie has a secret that could uproot them once again.
 
Inspired by the Book of Ruth, Annabelle’s Ruth is a 1950’s era “Ruth” story, set in western Tennessee.  How will Connie adapt to her new life amid the cotton farms, racial tension, and culture shock? 

Sutter’s Landing

Still reeling from tragic losses, Connie and Annabelle Cross face life with their signature humor and grace, until fresh hope arrives on their doorstep.

In early spring of 1955, Annabelle Cross and her daughter-in-law, Connie have nearly made it through the first winter on their own. Then the skies open up as West Tennessee and much of the south endures one of the worst floods in history. As many of their neighbors endure losses due to the flooding, Annabelle and Connie sit tight on dry ground.

As spring gives way to summer, Annabelle begins to dread Connie’s upcoming marriage and removal to Sutter’s Landing. Though she’s happy to note the growing affection between Alton Wade and her daughter-in-law, their marriage means Annabelle will be on her own for the first time in her life.

Connie’s doubts increase when Alton’s bigoted brother Jensen uses every opportunity to drive a wedge between them. Is she doing the right thing? Did she move too quickly? Unexpected summer visitors and anticipation of a new neighbor provide diversion and open possibilities for both Annabelle and Connie.

Favorite Friday Fiction: The Tiger in the Smoke by Margery Allingham

The first Friday of the month is when I share my best-loved classic fiction and Margery Allingham is one of my favorite authors. In her long series of literary detective fiction with universal uncle, Albert Campion, The Tiger in the Smoke is the most thrilling. It will keep you looking over your shoulder…

The Tiger in the Smoke

London, ‘the Smoke’ to Cockneys and the hipsters who appropriate their slang, is living up to its nickname: an unusual cold snap has combined with the fug from coal-fires to produce the ‘Great Smog’, blanketing the city in choking shadow. And lurking in those shadows is Jack Havoc, a killer with a particular fondness for knives. Havoc is by far the most dangerous villain that Albert Campion has ever encountered, and his startlingly realistic menace, combined with the light touch common to all the Campion novels, gives the book a modern feel, as it straddles a line between Golden Age detective fiction and contemporary psychological suspense.

 

Favorite Friday Fiction-Alone by Edie Melson

Today’s book is in the science fiction genre. Alone is a dynamic read that, at times, reminded me of the debut Star Wars, my all-time favorite science fiction movie. If you like science fiction, you’ll love Edie Melson’s debut novel…

Alone

After her family is killed in the cleansing, Bethany’s purpose in life has changed. No longer will she be allowed to work to save her dying planet. As a slave, endurance is her goal as she marks each day as one moment closer to an eternity spent reunited with those she loved. But when her planet is invaded, everything changes.

Now she must decide either to align herself with those from her planet who condemned her faith and killed her family, or with the warriors who have conquered her world. Ultimately her choice will mean life or death for more than just her planet’s ecosystem.

She alone holds the key to a powerful secret, and the fate of the entire galaxy depends on her decision.

Favorite Friday Fiction-Everybody’s Broken by Fay Lamb

Suspense is normally a genre I don’t read because, well, it’s so intense. But every once in a while I happen upon a book I just can’t put down. Like the one written by my friend, Fay Lamb, that will be well-worth your time.

 

Everybody’s Broken

The walls have ears … and voices. Voices that threaten …

Abra Carmichael’s husband, Beau, has been murdered. She begins to realize that the man she loved was never who he seemed. Beau’s secrets endanger Abra, their twin sons, and everyone who loved him. When Abra’s life and the lives of their boys are threatened, she flees to Amazing Grace, North Carolina, and to Beau’s family–people she never knew existed until the day of Beau’s funeral.

For six years Shane Browne, an award-winning songwriter had both wished for and dreaded the return of his cousin. Beau’s departure from their small hometown left behind his family and his inheritance, a grand Victorian with its legend of secret passages, which lay empty. Empty until Abra moves to Amazing Grace, into the house Beau willed to her only weeks before his death. Shane finds himself deeply drawn to Abra and her sons, desiring a future with them and his daughter.

But the danger follows Abra to the peacefulness of the North Carolina mountains. Abra and Shane are both threatened, and Abra claims to hear noises deep within the walls of the old home. Shane will do everything possible to keep Abra and her boys safe, even if that means revealing secrets of his own that will completely shatter Abra’s already broken heart and destroy his relationship with everyone he loves.

Click to tweet: Favorite Friday Fiction: Everybody’s Broken by Fay Lamb

 

Favorite Friday Fiction-Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Hello, book lovers! There’s nothing like first opening a new book, whether the pages crinkle in your newly purchased delight or you swipe open the e-book you’ve waited for with your finger. I LOVE BOOKS.

So, each Friday, please join me as I display the cover of a book I love and a blurb telling you, the reader, what you’ll find inside. On the first Friday of the month, I’ll share a cherished classic. The rest of the month will consist of newer fiction that has captured my heart. Ready? Let’s start with a classic.

I love mysteries and detective stories, especially ones that take place before the 1950’s. Here’s the one that started it all.

Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Collection

Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. He is the creation of Scottish born author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A brilliant London-based detective, Holmes is famous for his intellectual prowess, and is renowned for his skillful use of deductive reasoning (somewhat mistakenly – see inductive reasoning) and astute observation to solve difficult cases.

He is arguably the most famous fictional detective ever created, and is one of the best known and most universally recognizable literary characters in any genre. Conan Doyle wrote four novels and fifty-six short stories that featured Holmes. All but four stories were narrated by Holmes’ friend and biographer, Dr. John H. Watson, two having been narrated by Holmes himself, and two others written in the third person. The first two stories, short novels, appeared in Beeton’s Christmas Annual for 1887 and Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine in 1890.

The character grew tremendously in popularity with the beginning of the first series of short stories in The Strand Magazine in 1891; further series of short stories and two serialized novels appeared almost right up to Conan Doyle’s death in 1930. The stories cover a period from around 1878 up to 1903, with a final case in 1914. in this collection you will find: Novels: • A Study in Scarlet • The Sign of the Four • The Hound of the Baskervilles • The Valley of Fear Short Story Collections: • The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes • The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes • The Return of Sherlock Holmes • His Last Bow • The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes