Favorite Friday Fiction: The Healer’s Apprentice by Melanie Dickerson

The Healer’s Apprentice by Melanie Dickerson is an extremely well-written book of fairy-tale romance. It is rich in historical detail and makes it easy to imagine being right in the story. It’s listed as YA but I’d recommend it to anyone who likes transformed fairy-tales…

Click to tweet: Fairy-tale retelling at its best. “The Healer’s Apprentice.” #FridayReads #amreading 

The Healer’s Apprentice

In author Melanie Dickenson’s new book, a young healer’s apprentice named Rose believes she will never marry … until she meets Lord Hamlin, the future ruler of her village. Hamlin is everything she could ever want—kind, understanding, and a man of faith—but her low station and the fact he’s already betrothed to a mysterious woman makes their romance impossible.

As Lord Hamlin seeks to find the sorcerer who cursed his future bride, Rose’s life spins toward confusion. A creative retelling of the classic Sleeping Beauty tale.

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Favorite Friday Fiction: Hinds’ Feet on High Places by Hannah Hurnard

Hinds’ Feet on High Places by Hannah Hurnard is a beautifully written allegory about a young woman named Much-Afraid and the Good Shepherd. This book speaks to me each time I read it, which has easily been a half-dozen times. I so relate to Much-Afraid and her long journey to the High Places. Better have a box of tissues handy when you read this book…

Click to tweet: Over two million copies sold. “Hinds’ Feet on High Places. #FridayReads #amreading

Hinds’ Feet on High Places Continue reading

Favorite Friday Fiction: The Book of Things to Come by Aaron Gansky

The Books of Things to Come (A Hand of Adonai novel) by Aaron Gansky is another great fantasy book, the first in the series. It combines medieval-type fantasy with technology and even has a comic book/video game feel at times. It is different with a lot of twists and turns and I like that…

Click to tweet: 2016 Selah Award winner for YA fiction. #FridayReads #amreading

The Book of Things to Come

Winner of the 2016 Selah Award for Young Adult Fiction

At first, Lauren Knowles is thrilled to find she’s “clicked” herself inside Alrujah, a fantasy game she created with her best friend, Oliver Shaw. But the exhilaration of serving as a magical princess fades when she senses a demonic force – one they did not create – lurking in the shadows. 

Though they created a world of wondrous beauty blue-leafed forests, shimmering silver rivers, and expansive medieval castles Lauren and Oliver soon find their secret realm to be an ever-changing land of dark oppression and deadly sorcery. With the help of Aiden Price and Erica Hall, two friends from their high school in North Chester, the four teens must find a way out that can only be discovered from the dusty pages of the ancient leather-bound tome, The Book of Things to Come. 

Faced with questionable allies, invisible enemies, and increasingly dangerous levels of difficulty, the four must learn to work together, to trust each other … or be forever lost in this deadly game of virtual reality that’s become all to real. 

Careful what you create – it could kill you.

Favorite Friday Fiction: Miracle at the Higher Grounds Cafe by Max Lucado

Max Lucado is one of my favorite non-fiction authors so when I heard he released a fiction work, Miracle at the Higher Grounds Cafe, I ran to get my copy. I loved the storyline which surprisingly contains hints of the speculative genre. I liked this book because like all Lucado books, it left me greatly encouraged.

Click to tweet: Favorite Friday Fiction: Miracle at the Higher Grounds Cafe by Max Lucado #FridayReads #amreading 

Miracle at the Higher Grounds Cafe

What if you could ask God anything? What would you ask? And how would He answer?

Chelsea Chambers is on her own. After a public split from her NFL superstar husband, Chelsea takes a bold step out of the limelight and behind the counter of the Higher Grounds Café, an old-fashioned coffee shop in dire need of reinvention. But when her courage, expert planning, and out-of-this-world cupcakes fail to pay the bills, this newly single mom finds herself desperate for help. Better yet, a miracle.

Then a curious stranger lands at Chelsea’s door, and with him, an even more curious string of events. Soon, customers are flocking to the Higher Grounds Café, and not just for the cupcakes and cappuccino. They’ve come for the internet connection to the divine. Now the café has become the go-to place for people in search of answers to life’s biggest questions.

When a catastrophe strikes and her ex comes calling, Chelsea begins to wonder if the whole universe is conspiring against her quest to make it on her own. After a shocking discovery opens her eyes to the unseen world around her, Chelsea finds the courage to ask God a question of her own. Heaven answers in a most unexpected way.

Favorite Friday Fiction: Prophet by R.J. Larson

Prophet by R.J. Larson is the first book in the “Books of the Infinite” series. It’s a great fantasy read with strong ties to Biblical history interwoven throughout. I loved her characters and the pacing of the story. I couldn’t read this book fast enough.

Prophet

Ela Roeh of Parne doesn’t understand why her beloved Creator, the Infinite, wants her to become His prophet. She’s undignified and bad-tempered, and at age seventeen she’s much too young. In addition, no prophet of Parne has ever been a girl. Worst of all, as Parne’s elders often warn, if she agrees to become the Infinite’s prophet, Ela knows she will die young.

Yet she can’t imagine living without Him. Determined to hear the Infinite’s voice, Ela accepts the sacred vinewood branch and is sent to bring the Infinite’s word to a nation torn apart by war. There she meets a young ambassador determined to bring his own justice for his oppressed people. As they form an unlikely partnership, Ela battles how to balance the leading of her heart with the leading of the Infinite.

Click to tweet: Favorite Friday Fiction – Prophet by R.J. Larson #FridayReads #amreading

Favorite Friday Fiction: When Dawn Breaks by Jennifer Slattery

My friend, Jennifer Slattery, writes books that combine great story, strong plots, and interesting characters. When Dawn Breaks is another great read of hers. They always involve cutting-edge topics. Don’t miss reading any of her books…

 

When Dawn Breaks

As the hurricane forces Jacqueline to evacuate, her need for purpose and restitution forces her to head north. North to where her estranged and embittered daughter lives. She needs reconciliation, but can she find it in time? Will her handsome new friend be someone she can lean on during the difficult days ahead or must she relinquish her chance at love again to find peace? 

When Dawn Breaks is a contemporary romance novel filled with humor, romance, and intrigue, along with characters overcoming life’s obstacles and embracing hope. When Dawn Breaks provides readers a look at how middle-aged men and women dealing with real-life issues find hope and peace in God’s will for their lives. The characters will inspire readers to look for ways God can turn their greatest tragedies and failures into beautiful acts of love and grace.

Be inspired to see how God longs to love and heal His children through other Christians. Written by a Hurricane Katrina survivor, this novel is an excellent choice for book clubs as well as women’s Bible study discussion groups to encourage evaluation of one’s gifts and desires in light of God’s calling.

Favorite Friday Fiction: Gaudy Night by Dorothy L. Sayers

It’s the first of a new month and time for a new classic favorite. When I think of the Golden Age of Detective Fiction, I enjoy books by Arthur Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie, Margery Allingham, Ngaio Marsh, and Dorothy Sayers.

My very favorite Dorothy Sayers book is Gaudy Night. Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane have reached a point in their relationship where a decision must be made. Both have past issues they must deal with.  Will it be love and marriage or breakup?  Read on…

Gaudy Night

Back at Oxford for her reunion, Harriet Vane, Lord Peter’s beloved, finds herself in mortal danger.

Since she graduated from Oxford’s Shrewsbury College, Harriet Vane has found fame by writing novels about ingenious murders. She also won infamy when she was accused of committing a murder herself. It took a timely intervention from the debonair Lord Peter Wimsey to save her from the gallows, and since then she has devoted her spare time to resisting his attempts to marry her. Putting aside her lingering shame from the trial, Harriet returns to Oxford for her college reunion with her head held high—only to find that her life is in danger once again.
 
The first poison-pen letter calls her a “dirty murderess,” and those that follow are no kinder. As the threats become more frightening, she calls on Lord Peter for help. Among the dons of Oxford lurks a killer, but it will take more than a superior education to match Lord Peter and the daring Harriet.

Favorite Friday Fiction: Lightning on a Quiet Night by Donn Taylor

Lightning on a Quiet Night by Donn Taylor is an intense suspense book, the story of a small town in the South, 1948. An edge-of-your-seat read with wonderful twists and turns throughout.  A great book…

 

Lighting on a Quiet Night

Following a horrific murder, the town of Beneficent, Mississippi, population 479, tries desperately to hold onto its vain self-image. The young veteran Jack Davis holds that idyllic vision of the town and tries to share it with Lisa Kemper, newly arrived from Indiana. But she is repelled by everything in it.

While the sheriff tries to find the killer, Jack and Lisa’s contentious courtship reveals the town’s strange combination of astute perceptions and surprising blind spots. When they stumble onto shocking discovery about the town’s true nature, their love and the town’s vain self-image become the least of their worries.

Favorite Friday Fiction: DawnSinger by Janalyn Voigt

I read many genres but one of my favorite is fantasy. DawnSinger by Janalyn Voigt is a delight for anyone who enjoys fantastic characters, dragons, and journeys through exotic lands. This one is a winner in my book…

 

DawnSinger (Tales of Faeraven)

The High Queen is dying… At the royal summons, Shae mounts a wingabeast and soars through the air to the high hold of Faeraven, where all is not as it seems. Visions warn her of danger, and a dark soul touches hers in the night. When she encounters an attractive but disturbing musician, her wayward heart awakens. But then there is Kai, a guardian of Faeraven and of Shae. Secrets bind him to her, and her safety lies at the center of every decision he makes.

On a desperate journey fraught with peril and the unknown, they battle warlike garns, waevens, ferocious raptors, and the wraiths of their own regrets. Yet, they must endure the campaign long enough to release the DawnKing’and the salvation he offers’into a divided land. To prevail, each must learn that sometimes victory comes only through surrender.

 

Favorite Friday Fiction: The Prodigal by Brennan Manning & Greg Garrett

The Prodigal: A Ragmuffin Story by Brennan Manning & Greg Garrett is another one of those books you can’t put down. The book evoked anger, pity, fear, and other emotions within the analogy and beautiful written words. Another good one…

The Prodigal

Jack Chisholm is “the people’s pastor.” He leads a devoted and growing megachurch, has several best-selling books, and a memorable slogan, “We have got to do better.” Jack knows how to preach, and he understands how to chastise people into performing. What he doesn’t know is anything about grace.

This year, when it comes time for the Christmas sermon, the congregation at Grace Cathedral will look to the pulpit, and Jack will not be there. Of course, they will have seen plenty of him already–on the news.

After an evening of debauchery that leads to an affair with his beautiful assistant, Jack Chisholm finds himself deserted with chilling swiftness. The church elders remove him from his own pulpit. His publisher withholds the royalties from his books. Worst of all, his wife disappears with their eight-year-old daughter.

But just as Jack is hitting bottom, hopeless and penniless, drinking his way to oblivion, who should appear but his long-estranged father, imploring his prodigal son: “Come home.”

A true companion piece to The Ragamuffin Gospel, The Prodigal illustrates the power of grace through the story of a broken man who finally saw Jesus not because he preached his greatest sermon or wrote his most powerful book, but because he failed miserably. Jack Chisholm lost everything–his church, his family, his respect, and his old way of believing–but he found grace. It’s the same grace that Brennan Manning devoted his life to sharing: profound in nature and coming from a God who loves us just as we are, and not as we should be.