Favorite Friday Fiction: The Christmas Tree Treasure Hunt by Fay Lamb and Various Authors

The Christmas Tree Treasure Hunt by Fay Lamb and Various Authors is one woman’s journey to discover family and Christmas. I love journey stories, especially ones concerning the heart. You’ll enjoy this book.

Click to tweet: Review, “The Christmas Tree Treasure Hunt is like a combination of The Amazing Race and The Ultimate Gift.” #Christmas #kindnessmatters

The Christmas Tree Treasure Hunt

Grace takes delivery of a package and her life is turned upside down by nine sealed mystery envelopes from her late grandmother. Grammie’s instructions require Grace to take the journey of her lifetime, not only to far off places, but also into the deepest parts of her heart. As she follows the trail laid out for her and uncovers her family’s darkest secrets, Grace is forced to confront the loss and betrayal that has scarred her past and seek the greatest Christmas Treasure of all.

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Favorite Friday Fiction: A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

During the month of December, I’ll be sharing some of my most-liked Christmas books. For my favorite classic, I introduce an all-time beloved Christmas book and movie, A Christmas Carol. I’ve always been a big fan of Dickens’ works and, to me, this is a fabulous story. It’s whimsical, speculative, full of fantasy and wonder, and with a wonderful life lesson to boot. What more could you ask for in a Christmas classic? And for an added benefit, the one I share below is free on Kindle right now 🙂

Click to tweet: A Christmas Carol, classic Charles Dickens. #Christmas #FridayReads


A CHRISTMAS CAROL is a novella by Charles Dickens, first published in London on December 1843. The novella met with instant success and critical acclaim. A Christmas Carol tells the story of a bitter old miser named Ebenezer Scrooge and his transformation into a gentler, kindlier man after visitations by the ghost of his former business partner Jacob Marley and the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Yet to Come.

The book was written at a time when the British were examining and exploring Christmas traditions from the past as well as new customs such as Christmas cards and Christmas trees. Carol singing took a new lease on life during this time. Dickens’ sources for the tale appear to be many and varied, but are, principally, the humiliating experiences of his childhood, his sympathy for the poor, and various Christmas stories and fairy tales.

Favorite Friday Fiction: Bliss by Tracy Bowen and Jenness Walker

Bliss is a fantastic ride full of laugh out loud fun. The main character, Indie, is quirky but real, searching for life and finding it in an unexpected way.

I didn’t like to put the book down because I needed to know what was going to happen next. I loved the dry humor these authors added throughout. Check out this book…

Click to tweet: Bliss looks a little different than Indie Moore could ever envision. #FridayReads #fiction

Bliss

Following the stars, Indie Moore sets off to find ultimate happiness in South Florida. But in her quest for comfort and fortune, she encounters mishap and mayhem. She finds a home in a trailer park, a job scrubbing toilets, and a moody roommate-not quite the glamorous world she’d envisioned for herself when she left Rabbit Hole, Kansas. But maybe bliss looks a little different than she’d thought.

Laugh and cry with Indie, the Miss Adventure of misadventure, as she blunders on land, by sea, and in church, seeking love and a sense of belonging…seeking true Bliss.

Favorite Friday Fiction: The Cat Lady’s Secret by Linda W. Yezak

The Cat Lady’s Secret is my favorite of several great books by Linda Yezak. This one focuses on acts of kindness, something very near and dear to my heart. The characters are fun, even quirky, the plots speeds along, and there are some interesting twists and turns before the story’s over. I recommend it as an enjoyable read…

Click to tweet: The Cat Lady’s Secret focuses on acts of kindness. #FridayReads #kindnessmatters

The Cat Lady’s Secret

Emily Taylor loves to help people, loves to ease their burdens and make their dreams come true. But when a conman ruins her reputation, she discovers that helping others is safer and easier from behind the scenes.

When one of Emily’s gifts captures the attention of an avid journalist, her identity as the town’s anonymous benefactor’and her renewed relationship with her high school sweetheart’are threatened. As her private life begins to unravel, she realizes the one hope for regaining control lies behind prison walls.

Favorite Friday Fiction: The Spindle Chair by Shellie Arnold

The Spindle Chair is a southern fiction gem in a genre I enjoy reading and writing. Arnold’s characters are deep and real, and the plot moves along well. I really connected emotionally with this story…

Click to tweet: Southern fiction that’s beautiful and haunting.  #FridayReads #fiction

The Spindle Chair

“At once beautiful and haunting … a story you won’t soon forget”. ~ Ann Tatlock, Award-winning author of Once Beyond A Time, a Christy Award winner

Laurie Crane is happily married, yet she aches to have a child. During her husband’s moments of quiet sadness she senses a void she believes only a child can fill. Pierce wants a child, too and has spent years praying alongside his wife. But he has no idea that a “yes” from God will unearth long-buried memories and bring their marriage to the brink of catastrophe. What happens when “happily-ever-after” becomes more than you can bear?

Favorite Friday Fiction: Artists in Crime by Ngaio Marsh

Artists in Crime is one of Ngaio Marshs’ thirty novels with Inspector Roderick Alleyn set in England in the 1930’s. I love this one because it introduces Agatha Troy, an artist and teacher, who Inspector Alleyn falls in love with. I love a little romance in a good mystery novel. 🙂

Click to tweet: Classic mystery novel from the Golden Age of Detective Fiction. #FridayReads #Fiction

Artists in Crime

It was a bizarre pose for beautiful model Sonia Gluck–and her last. For in the draperies of her couch lay a fatal dagger, and behind her murder lies all the intrigue and acid-etched temperament of an artist’s colony.

Called in to investigate, Scotland Yard’s Inspector Roderick Alleyn finds his own passions unexpectedly stirred by the fiesty painter Agatha Troy–brilliant artist and suspected murderess. First published in 1938.

Favorite Friday Fiction: The Mermaid’s Sister by Carrie Anne Noble

The Mermaid’s Sister is a different type book than I usually read but when I heard it won Amazon’s Breakthrough Novel for YA fiction and the Realm award for best Speculative fiction, I had to check it out. The book did not disappoint. It combines Speculative at its best with a coming-of-age story. Well worth the read…

Click to tweet: Amazon’s Breakthrough Novel for YA fiction. “The Mermaid’s Sister.” #FridayReads #amreading 

The Mermaid’s Sister

There is no cure for being who you really are…

In a cottage high atop Llanfair Mountain, sixteen-year-old Clara lives with her sister, Maren, and guardian Auntie. By day, they gather herbs for Auntie’s healing potions; by night, Auntie spins tales of faraway lands and wicked fairies. Clara’s favorite story tells of three orphaned infants—Clara, who was brought to Auntie by a stork; Maren, who arrived in a seashell; and their best friend, O’Neill, who was found beneath an apple tree.

One day, Clara discovers iridescent scales just beneath her sister’s skin: Maren is becoming a mermaid and must be taken to the sea or she will die. So Clara, O’Neill, and the mermaid-girl set out for the shore. But the trio encounters trouble around every bend. Ensnared by an evil troupe of traveling performers, Clara and O’Neill must find a way to save themselves and the ever-weakening Maren.

And always in the back of her mind, Clara wonders, if my sister is a mermaid, then what am I?

Favorite Friday Fiction: The Miracle Man by Buck Storm

Every once in a while I come across a writer who just mesmerizes me with his or her books, like The Miracle Man. Buck Storm is one such writer. His books are fun, moving, with a great story line, and quirky characters. I’ll buy all of his books…

Click to tweet: 2016 Selah Awards Finalist. “The Miracle Man.” #FridayReads #amreading 

The Miracle Man

2016 Selah Awards Finalist

Welcome to Paradise, a sleepy, backwater town in the mountains of Southeastern Arizona where police chief Luke Hollis is perfectly content to concentrate on nothing but issuing the occasional speeding ticket. Well that and working up the nerve to approach his dispatcher, Ruby Brooks, for a date. 

When an unexplained healing occurs during a service at the Mount Moriah Pentecostal Church of God, Hollis finds his simple belief system challenged and his life changed forever. Throw in a struggling minister, a world-class grifter, and a stranger with an unbelievable story of love and redemption and the stage is set for The Miracle Man. By the time it’s all over everyone involved will come face to face with a power that’s greater and more wonderful than any of them could have ever imagined.

 

Favorite Friday Fiction: The Healer’s Apprentice by Melanie Dickerson

The Healer’s Apprentice by Melanie Dickerson is an extremely well-written book of fairy-tale romance. It is rich in historical detail and makes it easy to imagine being right in the story. It’s listed as YA but I’d recommend it to anyone who likes transformed fairy-tales…

Click to tweet: Fairy-tale retelling at its best. “The Healer’s Apprentice.” #FridayReads #amreading 

The Healer’s Apprentice

In author Melanie Dickenson’s new book, a young healer’s apprentice named Rose believes she will never marry … until she meets Lord Hamlin, the future ruler of her village. Hamlin is everything she could ever want—kind, understanding, and a man of faith—but her low station and the fact he’s already betrothed to a mysterious woman makes their romance impossible.

As Lord Hamlin seeks to find the sorcerer who cursed his future bride, Rose’s life spins toward confusion. A creative retelling of the classic Sleeping Beauty tale.

Favorite Friday Fiction: Hinds’ Feet on High Places by Hannah Hurnard

Hinds’ Feet on High Places by Hannah Hurnard is a beautifully written allegory about a young woman named Much-Afraid and the Good Shepherd. This book speaks to me each time I read it, which has easily been a half-dozen times. I so relate to Much-Afraid and her long journey to the High Places. Better have a box of tissues handy when you read this book…

Click to tweet: Over two million copies sold. “Hinds’ Feet on High Places. #FridayReads #amreading

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